MTSS – RTI

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Q&A about RTI- http://idea.ed.gov/explore/view/p/,root,dynamic,QaCorner,8,

Question C-2: May an LEA require that all children suspected of having a SLD first be assessed using an RTI process before an eligibility determination may be made?

Answer: If an LEA is using RTI for all its students, it may require the group established under 34 CFR §300.306(a)(1) and 34 CFR §300.308 for the purpose of determining the eligibility (eligibility group) of students suspected of having a SLD to review data from an RTI process in making an eligibility determination. Models based on RTI typically evaluate the child’s response to instruction prior to the beginning of the evaluation time period described in 34 CFR §300.301(c)(1), and generally do not require as long a time to complete an evaluation because of the amount of information already collected on the child’s achievement, including observation data. If the eligibility group determines that additional data are needed and cannot be obtained within the evaluation time period described in 34 CFR §300.301(c)(1), the parent and eligibility group can agree to an extension of the timeframe. However, as explained in Question C-1, parents can request an evaluation at any time, and the public agency must either obtain consent to evaluate and begin the evaluation, or, if the public agency declines the parent’s request, issue a prior written notice as required by 34 CFR §300.503(a)(2).

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Question C-5: When implementing an evaluation process based on a child’s response to scientific, research-based intervention, the regulations require that a “public agency must promptly request parental consent to evaluate a child (34 CFR §300.309(c))” if the “child has not made adequate progress after an appropriate period of time (34 CFR §300.309(c)(1)).” Please define “promptly” and “adequate” in this context.

Answer: The Federal regulations under 34 CFR §300.309(c) require that if a child has not made adequate progress after an appropriate period of time, a referral for an evaluation must be made. However, the regulations do not specify a timeline for using RTI or define “adequate progress.” As required in 34 CFR §300.301(c), an initial evaluation must be conducted within 60 days of receiving consent for an evaluation (or if the State establishes a timeframe within which the evaluation must be completed, within that timeframe). Models based on RTI typically evaluate a child’s response to instruction prior to the onset of the 60-day period, and generally do not require as long a time to complete an evaluation because of the amount of data already collected on the child’s achievement, including observation data. A State may choose to establish a specific timeline that would require an LEA to seek parental consent for an evaluation if a student has not made progress that the district deemed adequate.

We do not believe it is necessary to define the phrase “promptly” because the meaning will vary depending on the specific circumstances in each case. There may be legitimate reasons for varying timeframes for seeking parental consent to conduct an evaluation. However, the child find requirements in 34 CFR §300.111 and section 612(a)(3)(A) of the Act require that all children with disabilities in the State who are in need of special education and related services be identified, located, and evaluated. Therefore, it generally would not be acceptable for an LEA to wait several months to conduct an evaluation or to seek parental consent for an initial evaluation if the public agency suspects the child to be a child with a disability. If it is determined through the monitoring efforts of the Department or a State that there is a pattern or practice within a particular State or LEA of not conducting evaluations and making eligibility determinations in a timely manner, this could raise questions as to whether the State or LEA is in compliance with the Act.  DOE- Q&A

 

Files for RTI- in EXCEL:

 Resources:

CBM Measurements – Math

CBM Reading Manual

CBM Reading Handouts

Intro to CBM Manual

USING CBM FOR PR

Example of tiers with the standards for place Value

A CBM Resource file is located here http://psjaisd.schoolwires.net/cms/lib09/TX21000459/Centricity/Domain/1488/CBM%20Measurements%20-%20Math.pdf

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Consider this example from mathematics in grade 2: Mathematics Standards in Grade 2—  Standard 2.NBT.1: Understand place value. Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens – called a hundred (2.NBT.1)  Standard 2.NBT.5 and .7: Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract (fluently within 100; add and subtract within 1000 – 2.NBT.5 and 2.NBT.7).  Standard 2.NBT.8: Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number 100-900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a given number 100-900.

Problem: A student wrote the sum of 46 + 37 as 713 instead of 83. Use the following tiers of intervention to improve student understanding of numbers and operations in base ten. Tier 1 If a student can quickly decompose 13 as a ten plus three more ones, then connect the picture to their explanation while revisiting the number of tens.

Level 1–Do a “think aloud.” What is 46 composed of? (4 tens and 6 ones). 37? (3 tens and 7 ones). Have the student say it and hear it. Using drawings or place value models to show a picture of each number and what happens when numbers are composed. For example, what happens to the 13 ones? (13 ones become a ten and 3 ones). Connect the picture to their explanations (Standard 2.NBT.1).

Example 1: Have the student say the number out loud; 46 + 37 as 4 tens and 6 ones added to 3 tens and 7 ones. Pose questions about the total number of tens versus the number of ones (7 tens, 6 ones added to 7 more ones) ( Standard 2.NBT.1). Students can then decompose the 13 ones into one 10 and three ones and add the result to the seven 10s. (Standard 2.NBT 8)

Example 2: Initially start with the student counting by ten (46, being added to 3 more tens). The student will say 56, 66, 76; followed by counting 7 more ones (Standard 2.NBT 8). Tier 2: Can the student count and group by 10s? If not, address the misconception by having them count by 10s (show each resulting sum of +10 using a 100s chart).  Standard 1.NBT.2: Understand place value. Understand that the two digits of a twodigit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases: 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones- called a ten; the numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones (1.NBT.2)  Standard 1.NBT.4: Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract. Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a onedigit number; and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value (1.NBT.4).

Example 3: Have the student tell you what happens when one does: 46 + 10; 46 + 20, 46+ 30; Illustrate each successive addend on a 100s chart. Ask, “What would I need to add to get to the next decade (get to 80; 76 + 4 = 80)? So what happens when I add 7 more (instead of a mere 4)?” (Standard 1.NBT.2 and 1.NBT.4) Connect this directly to concept of place value—focusing on students understanding a bundle of ten. [“What is 46 composed of (4 tens 6 ones)? 37? (3 tens and 7 ones)”] Let the student say it and hear it. Use drawings or place value models to show process.

Tier 3: Are the students having difficulty composing and decomposing, and relating the bundle to a group of 10? Go back to drawings, models, and place-value cards to find the sum found in earlier grade levels. 

Standard 1.OA: Add and subtract within 20. Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten; decomposing a number leading to a ten.

Standard K.NBT.1: Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value. Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition. Level 1–direct modeling by counting using simpler numbers. 6 + 5, 6 +6, 6+7, 6+8 – have the student model, sketch the picture using a ten-frame, and discuss orally what happens in each case (we end up with a ten) (Standard 1.0A and K.NBT.1). 25 Let the student find some other addends that will make a ten with some ones left over (student will write: 7 +4, 7 +5; 9 + 3) (Standard K.NBT.1).
Talk with the student about why they chose some of the numbers. Tell the student to look at some two digit numbers (i.e., 14 + 6; 13 + 7; 12 + 8). Have the student describe what happens (show resulting sums using two 10 frames).
Help the student develop the idea of groups of 10 (Standard K.NBT.1 and 1.0A); Have students discuss what happens when adding (i.e., 14 + 7; 13 + 8; 12 + 9).
Revisit the sums using two 10 frames and also record the results on a 100s charts.
Make explicit connections between another group of 10 with a specific number of ones remaining.

Recommendations: This section was pulled from http://www.cgcs.org/cms/lib/DC00001581/Centricity/Domain/87/77–Achievement%20Task%20Force–RTI%20White%20Paper-Final.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subsection 6B shows that we may use RTI with SLD students, and

It also says

WRIGHTS LAW https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdM3nC8Sdh8

 

 

 

https://weareeagles.wikispaces.com/file/view/RtI+Manual+FINAL+2010%5B1%5D.pdf

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